• Suntec City’s interactive Christmas Tree based on the Galton game measuring 9.5 m-high in 2014

  • Christmas at 112 Katong 2015 saw CJ the Bubble Girl enclosed 15 volunteers inside a giant soap bubble.

  • The Longest Handbell Performance went on for 24 hours in Dec 2013 at the airport played by Ministry of Bellz

  • 718 people wore antler headbands and red noses for a 3.5km walk at the Sports Hub, 2014

  • 4.8m Teddy Bear Christmas Tree at Conrad Centennial, 2008

  • 3m tall Christmas tree made of recycled glass bottles at Sentosa, 2011

  • Clarke Quay’s 5.5m Christmas Tree made of 48 TV screens, 2011

  • A bottle-capped greeting!

  • 89.5m-long Swiss roll cut up into 50 log cakes, at Eunos CC 2012

  • 5.5m-high Christmas tree made up of 5,000 pieces of wishing stars at Kampong Ubi-Kembangan GRC, 2010

  • 10m-tall cardboard Christmas tree at Millenia Walk, 2015 

  • 3m-tall Christmas tree made of live bottled plants in Chong Pang, 2015

  • 40 Santa Clauses and 35 Santa Rinas at Boon Lay CC, 2014

  • Ministry of Bellz’s 24-hr Christmas performance at Changi Airport, 2013

  • 555 people wore Santa hats at Bugis+ Christmas celebration, 2009

Treatment for Alzheimer’s

Treatment for Alzheimer’s

University of Queensland researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques – structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients.

Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects  50 million worldwide. If a person has Alzheimer’s disease, it’s usually the result of a build-up of two types of lesions – amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Amyloid plaques sit between the neurons and end up as dense clusters of beta-amyloid molecules, a sticky type of protein that clumps together and forms plaques. Neurofibrillary tangles are found inside the neurons of the brain, and they’re caused by defective tau proteins that clump up into a thick, insoluble mass. This causes tiny filaments called microtubules to get all twisted, which disrupts the transportation of essential materials such as nutrients and organelles along them, just like when you twist up the vacuum cleaner tube.

Publishing in Science Translational Medicine in 2015, the team describes the technique as using a particular type of ultrasound called a focused therapeutic ultrasound, which non-invasively beams sound waves into the brain tissue. By oscillating super-fast, these sound waves are able to gently open up the blood-brain barrier, which is a layer that protects the brain against bacteria, and stimulate the brain’s microglial cells to activate. Microglila cells are basically waste-removal cells, so they’re able to clear out the toxic beta-amyloid clumps that are responsible for the worst symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

The team reports fully restoring the memory function of 75 percent of the mice they tested it on, with zero damage to the surrounding brain tissue. They found that the treated mice displayed improved performance in three memory tasks – a maze, a test to get them to recognise new objects, and one to get them to remember the places they should avoid. The team says they’re planning on starting trials with higher animal models, such as sheep, and hope to get their human trials underway in 2017. (Extracted from sciencealert.com)

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