• Suntec City’s interactive Christmas Tree based on the Galton game measuring 9.5 m-high in 2014

  • Christmas at 112 Katong 2015 saw CJ the Bubble Girl enclosed 15 volunteers inside a giant soap bubble.

  • The Longest Handbell Performance went on for 24 hours in Dec 2013 at the airport played by Ministry of Bellz

  • 718 people wore antler headbands and red noses for a 3.5km walk at the Sports Hub, 2014

  • 4.8m Teddy Bear Christmas Tree at Conrad Centennial, 2008

  • 3m tall Christmas tree made of recycled glass bottles at Sentosa, 2011

  • Clarke Quay’s 5.5m Christmas Tree made of 48 TV screens, 2011

  • A bottle-capped greeting!

  • 89.5m-long Swiss roll cut up into 50 log cakes, at Eunos CC 2012

  • 5.5m-high Christmas tree made up of 5,000 pieces of wishing stars at Kampong Ubi-Kembangan GRC, 2010

  • 10m-tall cardboard Christmas tree at Millenia Walk, 2015 

  • 3m-tall Christmas tree made of live bottled plants in Chong Pang, 2015

  • 40 Santa Clauses and 35 Santa Rinas at Boon Lay CC, 2014

  • Ministry of Bellz’s 24-hr Christmas performance at Changi Airport, 2013

  • 555 people wore Santa hats at Bugis+ Christmas celebration, 2009

The Internet of Nano-things

The Internet of Nano-things

Georgia Tech engineers have developed a way to use graphene nano-antennas to allow for devices powered by small amounts of scavenged energy. Communication between low-power nanomachines is impossible using metallic antennas. The researchers found graphene could generate an electronic “surface wave” that would allow nanonetworks of antennas just one micron long and 10 to 100 nanometers wide to do the work of much larger antennas, based on their modelling and simulations. Other nanosensors have been developed using the tools of synthetic biology to modify single-celled organisms, such as bacteria.

With the Internet of Things expected to comprise 30 billion connected devices by 2020, one of the most exciting technologies today is to make use of nano-sensors capable of circulating in the human body or being embedded in construction materials. Once connected, this Internet of Nano-things could have a huge impact on the future of medicine, architecture, agriculture and drug manufacture.

World’s Greatest New Breakthroughs Next
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